Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky | Part 3, Chapters 1–2

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Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment explained with chapter summaries in just a few minutes! Course Hero Literature Instructor Russell Jaffe provides an in-depth summary and analysis of Part 3, Chapters 1–2 of Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel Crime and Punishment. Download the free study guide and infographic for Crime and Punishment here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Crime-and-Punishment/infographic/ Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoevsky's canonical exploration of the ramifications of a single immoral act, traces the tale of Raskolnikov, a down-and-out law student who decides to commit a murder. Justifying his fatal attack on a pawnbroker by citing her immorality and the financial benefit of robbing her, Raskolnikov nonetheless descends into a spiral of guilt and must ultimately come to terms with his crime. Many of the characters also embody both virtue and vice, leaning toward one or the other as the situation dictates. Believing even a murderer has the potential to be a productive member of society, Porfiry presents a path to redemption. Sonia represents a path to confession and forgiveness; her compassion speaks to the importance of all humanity. Set in an era of conflict between religious and secular morality, this parable provides harrowing psychological insight into the consequences of moral relativism. Russian writer Dostoevsky is widely considered to be one of the great psychological novelists. In Crime and Punishment, first published in 1866, he explores anguish, analyzes human dilemmas, and examines the struggle between harsh social realities and religious belief. As a young man, Dostoevsky belonged to a radical socialist group, but in prison he returned to Christianity. The drama contains many enduring themes, including the conflict between "rational" concepts of morality and religious morality; suffering, and whether it is necessary for redemption; and alienation, as isolation from society can breed unstable thoughts. Important symbols include Napoleon as the “exceptional man,” Sonia’s cross, and Raskolnikov's garret. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero

Published by: Course Hero
Published at: ۹ months ago
Category: آموزشی